1 In 3 Gay/Bi Men Feel Unsafe In Home Lockdown

Survey On GBT Men In Lockdown

New information reveals just how the coronavirus pandemic and subsequent lockdown is affecting the mental, physical, and environmental health of queer men. And these reporters are also showing that queer men are facing more than one danger during this trying time.

The new survey came together through effort of dating app Hornet. Thomas Reuters Foundation then reported that that the app company was able to receive information from 35,000 men. Hornet found the respondents from their own international userbase of 30 million people. They asked users to fill out the questionnaire on their own volition. IT turns out that the majority of responses came from Brazil (18 percent). They were then followed by France and Russia with 10 percent. Finally, the fourth-largest group of respondents came from Turkey (9 percent).

sad gay man

GBT Men And Mental Health

One of the most concerning results from the study found that 30 percent of respondents reported fearing for their physical or emotional well-being while at home. Due to ongoing stigma and homophobia, which for many originates at home, queer men are an at-risk group for depression and anxiety disorders. Alex Garner, Hornet’s senior health innovation strategist, noted this in Hornet’s response to the survey.

“Think of how it feels to be 21 years old and living with a family that is unsupportive and constantly haranguing you about marrying a woman,” Garner said, according to Reuters. “We have to challenge ourselves to think of how to support people in environments where they feel unsafe.”

“Gay and bisexual men do have the skills to get through this, but we do need to prioritize the mental health of our LGBTQ community,” Garner added.

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I know I've been MIA for the past month and a half but tbh this whole thing has been really hard on me. I know has been a struggle for most everyone. One thing I've learned is that just because we're in isolation it does NOT mean that we're alone. We really are in this together! If you're struggling w/ depression and you've been feeling down and worthless know that I have been too. In school, in sports and in life I've always hated asking for help because I've wanted to seem strong, brave, tough, self-assured, etc but I've realized that sometimes you just need help and when you do you need to ask for it. It's literally what friends are for. Swallow your pride and text a friend saying "I'm feeling really down, can you talk?" It will help. I'm thankful for my friends and all of you for being my support system; I'm thankful for the people who have used this time to create fun, funny content that has made me laugh and offered levity amidst the darkness; I'm thankful for my health and, most especially, I'm thankful for my family. We had some serious scares this past month and it's put into perspective, more than ever before, the importance of family. My 9-month-old nephew, Bodhi, had a bad cough/ fever and started having trouble breathing. He ended up being flight for life'd to Denver Children's Hospital to be put on a respirator and spent a week in the ICU. Shortly after he returned home my 4-year-old niece, Bobbie, fell ill and had to be rushed to the same hospital to undergo two emergency surgeries. They're both finally home again and recovering! I'm incredibly thankful and forever grateful to our healthcare workers on the front line of this pandemic. I can't show my gratitude enough but, in an effort to help out, I've decided to join Cameo to make personalized videos for anybody who wants one w/ 100% of my proceeds going to #FirstRespondersFirst to raise money for the doctors & nurses risking their lives to save others. If you wanna buy a video there's a link in my bio and I'll match whatever we raise up to $10,000! Thank you all for staying home to help flatten the curve and also for reading my unsolicited novel of a caption. Let's #BeatTheVirus ❤️

A post shared by gus kenworthy (@guskenworthy) on

Mirror Words From Gus Kenworthy

This survey mirrors the words shared by Olympian skier Gus Kenworthy last month. While in lockdown, Kenworthy shared a picture of himself with his dog and captioned the post with commentary about dealing with depression. Specifically, Kenworthy is not in danger of family not accepting him. Instead, he’d been stressing over being constrained in lockdown and dealing with health issues within his family. That said, he was able to recognize that gay/bi/trans men are susceptible to depression, for varying reasons, during this time.

“If you’re struggling w/ depression and you’ve been feeling down and worthless know that I have been too,” he wrote on his social media update. “In school, in sports and in life I’ve always hated asking for help because I’ve wanted to seem strong, brave, tough, self-assured, etc., but I’ve realized that sometimes you just need help and when you do you need to ask for it. It’s literally what friends are for. Swallow your pride and text a friend saying ‘I’m feeling really down, can you talk?’ It will help.”

If you are having depressive or suicidal thoughts, you can reach out to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at (800) 273-8255. In addition, young GBTQ men (ages 24 and younger) can reach the Trevor Project Lifeline at (866) 488-7386. Or, you can access chat services at TheTrevorProject.org/Help or text START to 678678.

h/t: Thomas Reuters Foundation,

About Devin Jackson Randall 499 Articles
Geek by chance, and an artist by birth. Devin is a journalist and blogger who's always glad to share insights and developments on men's issues. Aside from news stories, he often writes about the roles placed upon men by society, and how both affect the relationships around us. Click on the hyperlinked text to follow him on --> Twitter. Email him at --> [email protected]